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Winter Cycling Holidays in Australia

Winter Cycling Holidays in Australia

 
A cycling trip in winter has a lot of great things going for it: fewer tourists around, fresh weather, a reason to get out of bed and make the most of your holidays - plus, you can snuggle up with a welcoming glass of red in front of a fireplace at many of our regional accommodations. So make the most of winter and explore Australia by bike; you won't regret it! 
 
Here are our top Australian cycling holidays to experience during the winter season (or see our full range here).
 

1. Capertee Valley in Comfort

Cycling along a shaded road on the Capertee Valley Cycle |  <i>Ross Baker</i>
 
Discover the outstanding scenery of the Capertee Valley - the second widest canyon in the world (1km wider than the Grand Canyon). Surrounded by World Heritage listed wilderness such as the Wolemi and the Gardens of Stone National Parks, you'll be able to explore a little known part of NSW. During the trip you’ll stay in deluxe bed and breakfast accommodation; think bathrobes, ensuites with heated towel rails, comfortable beds, and incredible views.
 
 

2. Great Victorian Rail Trail

Cyclists crossing the Goulburn River |  <i>Robert Blackburn</i>
 
The Great Victorian Rail Trail affords inspiring views of the Victorian High country foothills, and come evening, you'll settle into a local atmospheric hotel to enjoy the regions exceptional food and wine set in iconic country towns. With the ease of our luggage transfer service, an app to guide you each day and your accommodation all taken care of, this cycle journey opens up a whole new way to appreciate the natural beauty of this special corner of regional Victoria.
 
 

3. Townsville & Magnetic Island

Cycling Australia's spectacular Magnetic Island |  <i>Ian Anderson</i>
 
Chase the winter sun in North Queensland! The beauty of the North Queensland coast and nearby Magnetic Island is captured on this interactive cycling holiday combining Townsville with the Great Barrier Reef. On a series of guided cycles, explore the wetlands, river systems and coastal landscapes of the Townsville surrounds.

Then on Magnetic Island, cyclists will be immediately transported into a tropical paradise of palm tree lined sandy beaches fringed by coral reefs. This cycle trip will appeal to those seeking a combination of active exploring, relaxation and swimming.
 
 

4. Southern Highlands

Viewpoint at Belmore Falls near Robertson |  <i>Kate Baker</i>
 
We know that the Southern Highlands is renowned for its frosty mornings in winter, but with easily manageable cycling distances each day, you'll soon be fireside with a beverage of choice knowing you earned your dinner and experienced amazing scenery along the way. Our tailor made trip takes the back roads between iconic towns, where there is much to feast your eyes on as you pedal past grand estates, vineyards and green rolling hills. With the help of an e-bike, the hills are no problem, leaving you with plenty of time to linger over lunch, stop for wine tasting and explore the local sights. Plus, cosy up to inviting fires at your warm accommodation in charming villages such as Bundanoon.
 
 

5. Hunter Valley

Follow the Hunter Valley's dedicated cycle route |  <i>Bruce Baker</i>
 
Pedal from vineyard to vineyard while encountering kangaroos and cheese boards on the pleasant cycling paths in the Hunter Valley. Best of all, there's plenty of award winning wine on hand to help celebrate memorable cycling.
 
 

6. Central West Cycle Trail

A cyclist on route between Gulgong and Dunedoo |  <i>Michele Eckersley</i>
 
The newly established 400km long Central West Cycle Trail takes cyclists on a loop through New South Wales' Central West Region. There is everything you would expect from rural Australia including sweeping views, lonely roads and charming towns packed with character. During the week-long trip, you will be supported with ebike rental and luggage transfers between towns, giving you the freedom to cycle at a relaxed pace and take in the ever-changing landscape of grazing country, vineyards, national park' and reserves. 
 
We have handpicked accommodation in a combination of country pubs with shared bathrooms and family run motels with private facilities, with friendly hosts and tasty food options. The sense of achievement as you roll into Mudgee on the last cycle day is a true highlight on this groundbreaking cycle trail. There are a variety of trips to experience the Central West Cycle Trail.
 
 

7. Top End & Kakadu Supported Cycle

Discover the real Australia by bike.
 
Become immersed in the Top End of Australia on the ultimate cycling trip. Over 5 days we’ll ‘hike and bike’ to some of the best locations in the region, enjoying two nights at our private semi-permanent campsite in Kakadu with a million-star view and the crackle of a campfire. We’ll swim in remote rockpools, meet Indigenous guides who will share their connection to land then create some dust as we cycle down back roads and along some selected scenic roads. This is an amazing round trip of over one thousand kilometres travelling a round circuit south from Darwin then east to Kakadu before circling back west from the southern reaches of Kakadu to Litchfield National Park before returning to Darwin.
 
 

8. Brisbane Valley Rail Trail

Old Coominya Station |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 
At 161km (100mi) in length, the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail (BVRT) qualifies as the longest rail trail in the country. Our cycle tour starts at the top of the range, giving you an easy start downhill to the plains of the Brisbane Valley and back to Walkuraka over three days. The cycling is on mixed surfaces of gravel, dirt and asphalt and is achievable for anyone of reasonable fitness and cycling ability. 
 
Along the route, you'll pass through prime agricultural land, a rugged mountain range and forests of Blackbutt, Hoop Pine and Cedar. Stops at historical townships with good coffee and bakery items, interesting museums and friendly pubs are all part of the BVRT experience. At night, stay in comfortable accommodation and soak up the atmosphere of country Queensland towns. It's also possible to extend the rail trail adventure by combining this trip with the Kilkivan Rail Trail.
 
 

9. NSW South Coast

A great sense of achievement arriving into Huskisson on the South Coast Cycle |  <i>Kate Baker</i>
 
The South Coast of NSW isn’t just home to some of Australia’s most idyllic beaches, it also features top food and wine locations, magical wilderness walks, Aboriginal cultural experiences as well as many vantage points to spot dolphins, whales and even seals in their natural element.

A self-guided cycling trip along the NSW South Coast is the best way to take in the beauty and activities in the region. Whether you choose to cycle the South Coast’s coastline or venture further into the hinterland towns there is no shortage of things to do out of the saddle. Relax on some of the whitest sands you’ll find anywhere in the world, shuck a fresh oyster, walk through a rainforest or hit the water for some stand-up paddle boarding or kayaking.
 
 

 
Want more cycling options? Take a look at our full range of bike holidays in Australia for June, July and August.
 
 
Central West Cycle Trail Reviews

Central West Cycle Trail Reviews

The Central West Cycle Trail is quickly becoming one of Australia's most popular bike routes, and with glowing reviews such as these, it's easy to see why. From Queensland to Canberra, cyclists from around Australia are marvelling at the classic country scenery and sense of community that this trail provides.
 
See what travellers have to say about our self-guided and supported cycling tours along the Central West Cycle Trail below. 
 
Mt Carl Trail on the CWC between Mendooran and Ballimore |  <i>Michele Eckersley</i>
 

Central West Cycle Trail Self Guided Cycle Tour Reviews

 
"Good riding through open country of western NSW mostly on reasonably good gravel roads. There had been plenty of rain before our tour so we navigated a few spillways which was fun as well. Accommodation was variable but all acceptable and same with the meals. Navigation with the app worked well no problem. Bikes were brand new and no big problem. Need to improve puncture resistance from a spikey weed. Enjoyed the trip and would do it again." B. Hartnett, Prospect.
 
You'll be happy to hear that we're improving our bikes with puncture-proof tyres that will be better suited for the rugged conditions of the Central West - Australian Cycle Tours team.
 
"☆☆☆☆☆ Wonderful trail and everything was very well organised." C. Baxter, NSW.
 
The Royal Hotel in Mendooran on the CWC |  <i>Michele Eckersley</i>
 
"Good route, enjoyed it. Great value to see the effect on small regional villages... new business post drought, covid etc." H. Mackinnon, Longford.
 
"Almost everything went well. Bikes great, navigation app almost perfect and accommodation fun." J. Jeffrey, Canberra.
 
 
 
Happy cyclist on the route between Dubbo and Wellington |  <i>Michele Eckersley</i>
 

Central West Cycle Trail Supported Cycle Tour Reviews

 
"☆☆☆☆☆ Shawn was professional and friendly. The routes were great and our app and the information supplied was top rate. The scenery and roadside food stops were amazingly beautiful. We always felt fully supported, but our journey as cyclists was independent and so fun was had by all." S. Smith, Orange.
 
"The tour was well planned. Our tour guide, Shawn, is an excellent guide and treated us well throughout the trip. Good support vehicle and ongoing instructions to guide us each day made the tour even more enjoyable." P. Campbell, NSW.
 
"Great fun with our group. We had such a good time. I was grateful for a lift with the luggage transfer lady in day 2. Such possibilities may need to be available in future." E. Muspratt, Queensland.
 
Cycling group along the Central West Trail |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 
"I loved the Central west trail. Australian Cycle Tours were very accommodating and helpful in assisting me to join the tour for one day less, due to a prior commitment. Our guide Shawn was a great help to us all, thoughtful, informative and interesting. The countryside was a picture after heavy flooding and we lucked in with the weather. Only one very windy day, and blue skies the rest." L. Cunningham, Mosman.
 
"I really enjoyed the adventure. Dubbo motel was very generous in letting us use their washing machine and dryer." A. Hill, Maroochydore.
 
"Great trip, 6 days of riding, a bit challenging at times, but enjoyable. Most of the accommodation was really good, especially in the motels, only 1 pub wasn’t that great. Shawn did a great job of making lunch every day and carting our gear around. Only 6 of us on the tour, but the people we were with were a bundle of laughs, so a great time was had by all." R. Thompson, Rathmines.
 
 
The amazing Winx silo art in Dunedoo |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>

Central West Cycle Trail Highlights Self Guided Cycle Tour Reviews

 
"I loved the trail particularly as the countryside is looking beautiful after a great season of rain. Very atmospheric. The self guided approach worked for us and I found the app useful. The bikes were great and the team were really communicative and helpful. Our luggage was waiting for us at all venues." L. Mitchell, Bronte.
 
"The organisation and support were both fantastic. Brett was superb. The route worked well. All the small towns were interesting and the facilities were good. Without exception the accommodation was clean and the hosts friendly." S. Blattman, Bokarina.
 
Cycling the CWC out of Dunedoo |  <i>Michele Eckersley</i>
 
"Overall a great experience. Difficulty was experienced with navigation due to heavy rain and not wanting to ruin a mobile phone. Slushy wet unsealed road conditions were bypassed on several occasions. Accommodation quality was mixed but eclectic (beds were always comfortable and pub meals surprisingly good). Some upgrades to toilet and shower facilities in pubs are needed for a large group like ours. The hire ebikes performed faultlessly, and bag shuttles worked very well. Perhaps better CWC signage on intersections could be of benefit and encouragement of Airbnb accommodation for cyclists to offer alternative accommodation could help." P. Sorensen, Buderim.
 
 
Happy cyclists on the Central West Trail |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 
 

 
 
Have you cycled the Central West Cycle Trail yet? If so, tell us what you thought in the comment section below, otherwise let us know what part you're most excited for.
 
   
 
Watch: Enticing Teaser Trailer of the Central West Cycle Trail

Watch: Enticing Teaser Trailer of the Central West Cycle Trail

These days, big-budget film studios are constantly releasing trailers for their trailers! While it can seem a little excessive, it does show you a snapshot of what to expect in the movie without explaining the entire storyline.
 
It's a similar point with this short, 1-minute official video from the Central West Cycle Trail community. It's a teaser trailer for the Central West Cycle Trail - it highlights the towns travelled through, shows peaceful drone footage of the country landscapes, and explains some interesting features of the trail. Best of all, it makes you want to see more, which can really only be done by experiencing the Central West Cycle Trail yourself.
 

Watch the Central West Cycle Trail teaser trailer

 
Experience the Central West Cycle Trail on an unforgettable Australian tour:
 

 
Are you keen to cycle the Central West Trail? Let us know in the comment section below, and don't forget to share this article with a cycling mate.
 
  
Our Shiny New Fleet of Merida E-Bikes

Our Shiny New Fleet of Merida E-Bikes

Fantastic news for cycle tourism in Australia - we have recently upgraded our fleet of e-bikes. These had been ordered over a year ago but held up; partly due to the pandemic, partly due to the high worldwide demand for electric bikes. But they're finally here and ready to ride and we couldn't be happier.
 
Get to know our brand-spanking new e-bikes, the impressive Merida eSpresso CC 400 EQ Electric Hybrid Bike Silk in Titan/Black, in the below article.
 
Merida E-Bike is perfect for cycle touring with good battery range and a comfortable ride

These bikes are available on the following tours:
*we use a range of brands of e-bikes on these trips and therefore a Merida bike is not guaranteed
Merida e-bikes in the Southern Highlands |  <i>Kate Baker</i>
 
Here's a highlights video from the team at 99 Bikes.
 
 
If you're a tech geek, here's what the experts at Merida Bikes have to say about this e-bike.
 
"Whether your commute takes in forest trails and gravel tracks or you just want the freedom to explore at weekends, the eSPRESSO CC 400 EQ delivers all the convenience of a city e-bike with added off-road ability. That's because our low step-through ENERGY CRADLE frame is stiff enough to cope with dirt tracks while also housing an internal 630 Wh battery and the trekking dedicated Shimano E6100 drive unit. 
 
While the suspension fork and seat post help keep you comfortable when it gets bumpy, we've fitted it with a host of kit to make city life easier and safer, with mudguards, rack, lights, lock and a kickstand as standard. A smooth-shifting Shimano 10-speed drivetrain and strong, low-maintenance hydraulic disc brakes add fuss-free control.
 
Merida e-bike gears |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>

The eSPRESSO CC range is the rugged sibling of the regular eSPRESSO, with wider and grippier high-volume tyres on 650b wheels. While it's happy working hard in the urban jungle thanks to standard-fit mudguards, lights, lock, rack and kickstand, it's also capable of taking trips along forest trails and gravel tracks for fun. Models with the low step-through ENERGY CRADLE frame design come with either 630 Wh or 750 Wh fully-integrated batteries, while a more economical semi-integrated frame comes with a 504 Wh battery. 
 
All come with a refined but powerful Shimano STEPS pedal-assist motor, including the sporty EP8 unit on some models. Smooth and comfortable progress is assured with suspension forks on all models, while powerful hydraulic disc brakes allow effortless and controlled stopping. All have a high system weight of 150 kg which means plenty of capacity for rider and luggage."
 
 
The features include:
  • Trekking dedicated Shimano E6100 drive unit
  • Super low step-through ENERGY CRADLE frame design with internally mounted 630 Wh battery
  • Smooth Shimano 10-speed drivetrain
  • Suspension fork and seat post for comfort and control
  • Agile 650b wheels with grippy high-volume tyres
  • Fully equipped with guards, lights, lock, rack and kickstand
 

 
These Merida e-bikes are available on the following tours:
*we use a range of brands of e-bikes on these trips and therefore a Merida bike is not guaranteed
 
Are you unsure about the benefits of an e-bike? Read about Linda's initial reluctance to ride an e-bike, to her full-on adoption of Sparky and the promotion of electric bikes.
 
 

 
Do you ride an e-bike? What do you like about it? Share you thoughts in the comment section below.
  
Australia's Cycling Adventurer: Kate Leeming

Australia's Cycling Adventurer: Kate Leeming


Before you read about Kate Leeming we need a disclaimer: adventures mean different things to different people. For some, discovering Capertee Valley by bike, home to the world's second-largest canyon (bigger than the Grand Canyon!), is a fun adventure. For others, cycling from Mount Kosciuszko, at the top of Australia, down to the glittering coastline at Tathra, is a rewarding adventure.
 
For Kate Leeming, one of her incredible adventures was to cycle a 25,000km loop around Australia in order to promote the importance of education for sustainable development. 
 
Kate cycles the Buchanan Highway on the way to Victoria River Downs Station |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>
 
Pretty incredible! And her adventures don't come with comfortable accommodation, an optional e-bike, and all the logistics handled by the Australian Cycle Tours team.
 
>> We have a couple of copies of Kate's book, Out There and Back, about her Australian cycling expedition, to give away to 2 lucky members of the Australian Cycle Tours community. Subscribe now (it's free!) and be in it to win it. The prize will be drawn in June 2022.*
 
 

About Kate Leeming

As an explorer/adventurer, Kate has cycled a distance greater than twice around the world at the Equator. On August 16th 2010 she became the first person to cycle an unbroken line from Africa’s most westerly to its most easterly points; from Pointe des Almadies, Senegal to Cape Hafun, Puntland, Somalia.

Kate Leeming

Cycling 22,040 km over ten months, Kate’s Breaking the Cycle in Africa Expedition was not only a physical quest but an odyssey to highlight the development needs and activities of war-torn and poverty-stricken nations.

Cycling through twenty countries, Kate aimed to find out what is being done to give a ‘leg up’ rather than a ‘hand out’ – to shine a positive light on the issues, cultures and geography of Africa.


 
In June 2019, Kate completed another original expedition when she became the first person to cycle the entire Namibian coastline, a 1621km sand cycling expedition from the mouth of the Kunene River on the Angolan border to the Orange River mouth on the South African border.

Kate has two earlier world firsts under her belt – the Trans-Siberian Cycle Expedition (1993) when she became the first woman to cycle across the new Russia unsupported (aiding the children of Chernobyl), and the 25,000km Great Australian Cycle Expedition (2004/05) which included the first bicycle crossing of the Canning Stock Route by a woman.
 
Kate pushes a 50kg load through the sands of the Gunbarrel Highway |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> Crossing the saline Savory Creek, the main source of water for Lake Disappointment, the Canning Stock Route |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> Battling endless corrugations on the Tanami Track |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>

Kate’s latest challenge, Breaking the Cycle South Pole, will result in the first bicycle crossing of the Antarctic continent via the South Pole (2022).

The Breaking the Cycle education programme aims to help prepare our future leaders to make informed decisions to create a better world. Students across the globe can follow her preparatory activities and Antarctic expedition and partake in the Breaking the Cycle Education learning modules and lessons with the end goals of creating their own projects.

In March 2016, The University of Western Australia awarded Kate an Honorary Doctor of Education degree for services to education and community. She is a fellow of the Royal Geographic Society (UK), a member of The Explorers Club (New York), an Honorary Advisor for the Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award and a Scout Ambassador. Kate’s Australian and African expeditions were Official Activities for the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (UNESCO).

In 2014, Kate’s documentary Njinga won two awards at the Action on Film International Film Festival in Los Angeles – best cinematography and best documentary (sport). Njinga, Kate’s second book, complements the documentary; her first, Out There and Back, chronicles the Australian expedition. Kate’s latest production, a 4-part TV series about the Namibian expedition, Diamonds in the Sand, has been broadcast around the world (National Geographic Asia, Outside TV).
 
Njinga: Breaking the Cycle in Africa Out There and Back, The Story of the 25000-km Great Australian Cycle Expedition

In between expeditions, Kate works as a 'real' tennis professional. She has won 5 Australian Open singles titles and been ranked as high as world number 2 woman.

Kate grew up with her two sisters and two brothers on a wheat and sheep farm near Northam in Western Australia, about 130km east northeast of Perth. After attending Northam Primary School, she boarded at Perth College during her secondary schooling and went on to study for a Bachelor of Physical Education and Graduate Diploma of Education at The University of Western Australia before beginning her travels.  After spending 11 years living in the UK and France, Kate returned to Australia, this time to Melbourne where she now lives, working part time as a senior professional at the Royal Melbourne Tennis Club.
 
This biography was taken from Kate Leeming's Breaking the Cycle website.
 

> Kate's current adventure is in South America, where she's taking on the Andes, the Altiplano & the Atacama. This journey sees her cycle from Cusco, Peru, across the Altiplano in Bolivia and Chile and the Argentinian Puna de Atacama to Ojos del Salado, the world's highest volcano. She'll cover a distance of 5,000km in just 56 days. Learn more about this journey and follow her trip.




*Want to win a copy of Out There and Back? We have a couple of copies of Kate's book to give away to 2 lucky members of the Australian Cycle Tours community. Subscribe now (it's free!) and be in it to win it. The prize will be drawn in June 2022 (open to Australian residents only).

Read excerpts from Out There and Back.

> Cycling the Canning Stock Route in Western Australia

> Cycling the Tanami Track in the Northern Territory

> Read an interview with Kate Leeming from World Expeditions

Great Australian Cycle Expedition trailer

Watch this footage from Kate's journey to get a feel for the harsh terrain and conditions she was dealing with while crossing Australia.
 
 
 
Read about Kate's adventures:
 
> Out There and Back. The story of the 25 000-km Great Australian Cycle Expedition. Get your copy as a physical book or digital book, from only $10.
> Njinga. The story of Kate's astonishing 22,000-kilometre trek by bicycle across Africa.  This is more than a story of mental grit and physical endurance – it’s a story of hope. Get your copy of the book.
 
Donate to support Kate's adventures and educational endeavours:
 
 
Follow Kate's adventures on social media:
 
 
 

 
Were you inspired by Kate's adventures? Let us know what you thought in the comment section below.
 
  
Cycling the Canning Stock Route: Out There and Back

Cycling the Canning Stock Route: Out There and Back

 
Kate conceived and organised the Great Australian Cycle Expedition (GRACE), a 25 000-kilometre journey through her own country, 7000 kilometres of which were ‘off road’ on isolated tracks in remote regions. The five main tracks included the Cape York Peninsula Development Road, the Gulf Track, the Tanami Track, the Gunbarrel Highway and the Canning Stock Route. The purpose of the expedition was to promote the importance of, and contribute towards, education for sustainable development (learn more). 

Read this excerpt from Kate Leeming's book, Out there and back, where she cycles across the Canning Stock Route.
 
Kate's 25,000km cycle route around Australia


>> Want to win a copy of Out There and Back? We have a couple of copies of Kate's book to give away to 2 lucky members of the Australian Cycle Tours community. Subscribe now (it's free!) and be in it to win it. The prize will be drawn in June 2022.*
 
Out There and Back, The Story of the 25000-km Great Australian Cycle Expedition by Kate Leeming
 

Excerpt of Out There and Back. Chapter 10: The Grit Between My Teeth

Determined to beat the heat, I made an effort to start even earlier. But I was tired and, for the first time, I felt my spirit wane. My muscles were shaky and completely drained of energy, and my heart raced with each minor effort. Yesterday’s dehydrated state had caused extreme stress to my cells and they had not recovered.
 
Day 2 on the Canning Stock Route, crossing station country |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>

The first twenty kilometres to Savory Creek was utterly soul destroying. The sand dunes weren’t particularly high, but they ran haphazardly in different directions and the track wriggled through them like a seemingly never-ending maze, often traversing diagonally over the ridges, which meant long, slow inclines in hopeless sand. I couldn’t summon the power needed to pedal under these conditions, and restarting after losing balance was near impossible. Walking was almost as fast, and required far less energy. My average speed to Savory Creek was just 6.6 km an hour.

The severity of the conditions, combined with my exhausted state, led me to lose control of my emotions. As I trudged up the dunes, thoroughly feeling ground down, tears started to flow, like the summer storm I had endured three days earlier. A few sporadic drops evolved into a torrential downpour. The hot, dry sands instantaneously absorbed my salty trail, as if the desert refused to tolerate such a show of weakness, fragility, vulnerability.
 
Taking a break from the enormous corrugations on The Gulf Track |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> Kate pushes a 50kg load through the sands of the Gunbarrel Highway |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> A lone camel on the Docker River Road, NT |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>

Giving way completely, I sat down as if on strike. I had to think the whole situation through, remind myself of why I was doing this, of the level of satisfaction I would gain from achieving my goals. The CSR was the most important part of the expedition, and I always knew it was going to test my limits. I had at least another 1000 km of sand ridges to go. I had never given up on anything before and I reminded myself of how much I would regret throwing in the towel after only ten days and about one-third of the journey. I couldn’t bear to give my doubters any satisfaction.

Psyching myself into a fixated, almost robotic, state, I took several deep breaths and pushed off again. I wasn’t going to get there sitting on my bum! Every step forward was a step in the right direction and a step closer to my target. I set very short-term goals, such as reaching a small bush or a desert oak beside the track twenty or fiftymetres ahead, then gradually raised my sights to reach the next sand ridge. Making each manageable target was a small success – I was getting there. I needed to see my situation with ‘new eyes’, so I made a conscious effort to look for the beauty in my surroundings and appreciate that few people ever create such opportunities. It also helped if I diverted my mind away from the task at hand, so I searched for favourite songs and positive thoughts – I had transformed the desperate situation into a Beautiful Day. By the time I neared Savory Creek three hours later, I was feeling much better. I carved my way through the sand in an hypnotic fashion, with a new inner strength, no longer paralysed by the emotional or physical pain which had forced me to question what I was doing.

Don was surprised to catch up to me so soon on a samphire flat just before the creek. The terrain had been little obstacle for his vehicle and he had found this section much easier than the conditions between Wells 17 and 18. He couldn’t have imagined the journey I had been through during the previous three hours.
 
Crossing the saline Savory Creek, the main source of water for Lake Disappointment, the Canning Stock Route |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>

Savory Creek is the most notorious hazard for vehicles on the CSR. This time the saline creek was low, so the crossing, which Don treated it with respect, was straightforward. He took care to first walk a path across to ensure his vehicle would not hit any deep soft patches – with no buddy 4WD to act as an anchor to winch the vehicle from a bog, he had to exercise extreme caution. Although I relied on the 4WD to carry supplies, with potentially so many facets that could break down, it was the weak link in my journey. Don is a great mechanic, but if something failed drastically, we were extremely vulnerable. For me, Savory Creek was no different from any other water crossing I had done on the journey so far and as there was no threat of crocodiles I simply picked up the bike and walked across. The fine black mud which squelched between my toes was a reminder of how treacherous this obstacle is after rain.

Cycling along the dry clay-based banks of the creek towards its confluence with Lake Disappointment was a short-lived joy. Savory Creek is the principal stream supplying concentrated brine to the lake. From the Ophthalmia Range (near the mining town of Newman), it traverses hundreds of kilometres over the entire Little Sandy Desert. I am amazed that any water at all reaches Lake Disappointment before evaporating. 
 
Battling endless corrugations on the Tanami Track |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> The track to the Calvert Range, just off the Canning Stock Route |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> Looking for water near where Lasseter passed away on Irving Creek |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>

Lake Disappointment, whose great white expanse covers an area of approximately 64 km from north to south and 48 km from east to west, was named in 1897 by explorer Frank Hann.  Noticing that many waterways headed east from the Ophthalmia Range, Hann was searching for an inland sea surrounded by fertile land. The name he gave what he found – a lake which only holds water after heavy rain, and is perfectly flat except for an occasional island of sand – echoes his sentiments. Our arrival coincided with the hottest part of the day and lunch break. 
 
After yesterday’s experience, I decided to extend my rest period; there was nothing to be gained by flogging myself in such conditions – definitely unsustainable. Our down time provided the opportunity to walk out on to the lake’s surface, which was surprisingly moist underfoot. A massive mirage hung over the lake, like a giant blanket of steam, and the islands appeared to hover above the shimmering expanse like extra-terrestrial ships. If Greg was with me it would have definitely reminded him of his visit to Antarctica. It was comforting to imagine the freezing landscapes of that cold desert when it was 43 °C in the shade. I am certain the reverse idea has warmed the hearts of many polar explorers. Here the red dunes made a dramatic contrast with the whiteness of the lake and the stunted salt bushes which stabilised its shores in the foreground, the brightness of my surroundings forcing me to squint continuously.
 

  
> Kate's current adventure is in South America, where she's taking on the Andes, the Altiplano & the Atacama. This journey sees her cycle from Cusco, Peru, across the Altiplano in Bolivia and Chile and the Argentinian Puna de Atacama to Ojos del Salado, the world's highest volcano. She'll cover a distance of 5,000km in just 56 days. Learn more about this journey and follow her trip.
 
 

Great Australian Cycle Expedition trailer

Watch this footage from Kate's journey to get a feel for the harsh terrain and conditions she was dealing with while crossing Australia.
 
 
 
Read about Kate's adventures:
 
> Out There and Back. The story of the 25 000-km Great Australian Cycle Expedition. Get your copy as a physical book or digital book, from only $10.
> Njinga. The story of Kate's astonishing 22,000-kilometre trek by bicycle across Africa.  This is more than a story of mental grit and physical endurance – it’s a story of hope. Get your copy of the book.
 
Donate to support Kate's adventures and educational endeavours:
 
 
Follow Kate's adventures on social media:
 
 
*Want to win a copy of Out There and Back? We have a couple of copies of Kate's book to give away to 2 lucky members of the Australian Cycle Tours community. Subscribe now (it's free!) and be in it to win it. The prize will be drawn in June 2022. Open to Australian residents only.
 
Cycling Australia's Tanami Desert: Out There and Back

Cycling Australia's Tanami Track: Out There and Back


Kate conceived and organised the Great Australian Cycle Expedition (GRACE), a 25 000-kilometre journey through her own country, 7000 kilometres of which were ‘off road’ on isolated tracks in remote regions. The five main tracks included the Cape York Peninsula Development Road, the Gulf Track, the Tanami Track, the Gunbarrel Highway and the Canning Stock Route. The purpose of the expedition was to promote the importance of, and contribute towards, education for sustainable development (find out more). 
 
Read this excerpt from Kate Leeming's book, Out there and back, where she cycles across the Tanami Track.
 
Kate's 25,000km cycle route around Australia
 
 
> Kate's current adventure is in South America, where she's taking on the Andes, the Altiplano & the Atacama. This journey sees her cycle from Cusco, Peru, across the Altiplano in Bolivia and Chile and the Argentinian Puna de Atacama to Ojos del Salado, the world's highest volcano. She'll cover a distance of 5,000km in just 56 days. Learn more about this journey and follow her trip.
 
*Want to win a copy of Out There and Back? We have a couple of copies of Kate's book to give away to 2 lucky members of the Australian Cycle Tours community. Subscribe now (it's free!) and be in it to win it. The prize will be drawn in June 2022.*
 
Out There and Back, The Story of the 25000-km Great Australian Cycle Expedition by Kate Leeming
 

Excerpt of Out There and Back. Chapter 7: Tanami

 
This suddenly changed as we reached the edge of a plateau. Descending a jump-up, we were confronted by a vast ocean of sclerophyllous green, studded by the distant remnant buttes of the Victoria River catchment. Most of the land towards the horizon was part of Willeroo Station, owned by the Sultan of Brunei, and our destination for the first day out of Katherine. I had telephoned in advance from Coco’s to set up our stay. Jim, the manager, was expecting us and we joined him and the jackeroos for a beer and chat after their long day of mustering. Both parties could certainly justify hard-earned thirsts. As some of the musterers were camping out overnight, we were fortunate in being able to stay in their quarters and were generously given free rein of the kitchen.

The station extended as far as the boundary with the Gregory National Park towards which we squeaked our way the following morning. The park was named in honour of another of Australia’s greatest explorers, Augustus Gregory, one of whose many feats was to lead the first European land-based expedition to explore the Victoria River region in 1855-56. The Victoria River with its eight tributaries is the largest river system in the Northern Territory and one of Australia’s mightiest. During the Wet, it can rise 17 metres above its normal level in places.
 
Kate Leeming cycling around Australia |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> Day 1 on the Canning Stock Route. CSR also stands for Corrugations, Sand and Rocks! |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> A lone camel on the Docker River Road, NT |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>


Gregory and his team made many new discoveries in the world of botany, including the boab tree (Adansonia gregorii) which was named after him. The Australian boab, with its huge swollen trunk, is closely related to the African baobab (Adansonia digitata). It has been suggested that seeds from the tree were washed into the sea off the coast of Madagascar and carried across the Indian Ocean to the Kimberley coast of north-west Australia; birds then continued the boab’s eastwards expansion, carrying seeds across northern Australia. Despite similarities, the boab is not related to the ooline or bottle trees we saw in Queensland.

Interestingly, Aboriginal and African legends about the boab tree have a remarkable similarity. In essence they say: when God created the boab, it was to be the most beautiful tree in the universe, bearing the juiciest fruits. But when the tree grew and produced fruit which had a bad odour and tasted vile, God became so angry that this tree would not conform to His wishes that he pulled it out of the ground and slammed it upside-down into the earth. This is why the boab looks as though its roots are above the ground, struggling for survival.

The Victoria Highway carved its way through spectacular layered sandstone formations. Spinifex, lime green and sprouting after an unseasonal 100-mm boost of rain, clung on to all those parts of the scree slopes which weren’t bare rocks. Flowering yellow kapok trees contrasted against wine-coloured, iron-based cliffs.

We paused to appreciate glimpses of the spectacular Victoria River Gorge just before the roadhouse. At the end of the day we were to turn off the highway and onto the gravel. We had attempted to obtain information about water supplies on the route ahead, as the Victoria River Inn was the last obvious reliable information and water stop, but it was unclear what would be available. Greg had even contacted the ranger from the Gregory National Park, but did not receive any guarantee of drinking water. We loaded up at the inn, labouring out of the valley weighed down with an extra 12 litres of water each to last the next day and a half.

Most cyclists would barely acknowledge the junction with the Buchanan Highway, a well-graded gravel road heading south, but for us it was significant, a geographical landmark for the expedition. Travellers tend to stick to the tarmac and head towards Kununurra if they are circumnavigating the country. The turn-off marked the start of a 5500-km triangular loop through isolated desert tracks, traversing the Tanami Desert, into the Red Centre, along the Great Central Road and the Gunbarrel Highway. If all went according to plan, I then proposed to cycle with the aid of a support vehicle up the Canning Stock Route. The schedule was tight because I had to return to Halls Creek in the eastern Kimberley before the onset of the Wet season – usually in late October – and it was already mid-August. We bumped off from our high point near Kuwang Lookout, descending the stony road for a few kilometres before finding an old gravel pit secluded from the track, where we pitched the tent.

The Buchanan Highway is named after perhaps Australia’s most famous stockman, Nat Buchanan, and is a clue to our next destination, 110 kms to the south. Through his explorations which opened up huge tracts of land in the Northern Territory and the Kimberley, Buchanan helped settle more new country than any other person in Australia’s history. His most famous exploit was to lead a team of seventy drovers to move 20 000 head of cattle from Central Queensland to Glencoe and Daly River stations south of Darwin in 1880, a feat still unequalled by any other drover in the world. In 1883, he pioneered new tracks from Queensland to the Kimberley, where he took up Wave Hill in partnership with his brother. He also helped his son pioneer Flora Valley and Gordon Downs stations near Halls Creek in 1887. His mates often called him ‘Old Bluey’ because of his red hair and fair Irish complexion, which he shaded with a battered green umbrella.
 
Controlled burning causes the black smoke across the Stuart Highway near Katherine, NT |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> Crossing the saline Savory Creek, the main source of water for Lake Disappointment, the Canning Stock Route |  <i>Kate Leeming</i> Kate cycles the Buchanan Highway on the way to Victoria River Downs Station |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>


Our destination was Victoria River Downs (VRD) Station, perhaps Australia’s most famous cattle station – so well known that Greg recalled learning about it at school in England. VRD is the centrepiece of Heytesbury Beef, owned by the Holmes à Court family. I had contacted Catherine, a friend from my university hockey tour of Great Britain, and she kindly arranged for us to stay there. Acquired in 1989 by her father, the late Robert Holmes à Court, VRD is part of the company’s 33000 square kilometre (eight million acre) territory, which encompasses eight stations including Nat Buchanan’s Flora Valley. Wave Hill is a neighbouring property.

Despite not being a well-documented tourist route, the Buchanan Highway through Jasper Gorge and the heart of the Victoria River catchment would rate in my top ten days riding for consistently awe-inspiring scenery. The broad valley gradually narrowed over about 40 kms, until the road drew in to hug the path of Jasper Creek, sandwiched between two jagged cliffs. Reflecting the rugged surrounds, the state of the road surface inflicted lasting physical impressions on particular body parts and equipment. At Jasper Gorge, the palm-fringed permanent waterhole was a subtropical oasis which provided welcome respite from the heat of the day. South of the gorge, loose stones played havoc with our wheels as we climbed out of the valley.  Pushing past Kidman Springs towards the end of the day, we were entering productive station land. The alluvial black-soiled plains formed originally by Cambrian basalt can support up to ten cows per square kilometre – a pastoralists’ idea of heaven.

*          *          *          *          *

Arriving at the well-maintained VRD settlement seemed like heaven after a long week pedalling almost 900 kms since Darwin. With a population of around seventy, the station headquarters is virtually a small town, complete with its own post office, shop and weather station. Even the lawns are a manicured green. We cycled past the airstrip and the busy Helimuster Company headquarters, where pilots were arriving back in the last light after a long day of cattle mustering. Looking for Maureen and Jim Coulthard, who had kindly offered to have us to stay, took us past houses which were set just back from the banks of the Wickham River, As general manager, Jim is the big boss of the ‘Big Run’,the name most commonly given to VRD in the Top End.

As usual after a long stint, we wandered around in a daze for much of the following morning. After Karen had taken the meteorological readings – which she does five times per day – she drove us out past the airstrip and the old hospital, to the Centre Camp stock-yards. There John was working with a team of seven jackeroos and jillaroos, drafting and loading the Brahman cattle. The scale of it all was astounding. Six three-trailer road trains lined up in a row, each vehicle approximately 50 metres long; the queue that extended over 300 metres contained 372 wheels (sixty-two wheels per vehicle). Eighty per cent of the stock were being sent out to the rich flood plains to be fattened and 20 per cent of the heaviest (350 kg) beasts were being sold off to Indonesia. VRD/Heytesbury Beef have led the way in developing their own South-east Asian markets.

We were able to find out important details about our proposed route of cutting across from Lajamanu to the Tanami Track – a track, known locally as the Suplejack Road, about which we had previously been unable to discover any information. It was vital to know where we could find food and water supplies, and to be able to calculate accurately what we needed and what we could carry. Key in finding out about the Suplejack Road was to talk to Letty and Bill Cook at Suplejack Downs Station, the only habitation on the 240-km stretch. When I rang her, Letty sounded most enthusiastic about our proposed visit and told us that their cattle road trains were able to negotiate the road, even with the sand. This was enough assurance for us to commit to travelling the route.

I next called Bruce Ferrands of the famous Rabbit Flat Roadhouse for any further information he could give us. I had been warned by several people who had driven to Australia’s most isolated roadhouse that I might not get a friendly reception. Bruce and his wife, Jacqui, only open for business four days per week, from Friday through to Monday. Anyone showing up on Tuesdays, Wednesdays or Thursdays will not be served under any circumstances, no matter who they are or what they require. With this in mind, I dialled the number. But I needn’t have worried: when I explained what we were doing, Bruce proved helpful and enthusiastic and, in the end, I had a job putting down the phone. Before I did, he told me how to get in contact Newmont Mines. These two major installations – the Tanami Mine and The Granites – are about 100 kms apart, straddling Rabbit Flat and positioned conveniently to fit in with our daily schedule. I called the Tanami installation and they didn’t hesitate to accommodate us.
 
Crossing Victoria River upstream (away from the crocodiles (as we wanted to believe!) |  <i>Kate Leeming</i>

Satisfied that the following week was under control, we now had to pay attention to the following day. Jim gave us permission to travel their private tracks to Pigeon Hole Station, explaining the route with detailed maps and loaning us a two-way radio as an extra precaution. It was only just over 70 kms through but we were assured that the going would be slow.

Thinking that the route to Pigeon Hole, even if a bit rough, would be only a half-day ride, we were in no hurry to leave the comfort of the VRD Centre Camp. As the day started to heat up we at last farewelled our friends and headed off back past the airstrip, through a pair of rusty gates and across the shallow pools in the sandy Wickham River bed. The deep sand on the track was testing for a few kilometres, but then the land opened out into vast plains with more ancient escarpments. A sense of freedom enveloped me as we crossed land which few cyclists would have had the opportunity to tackle. The usual red soil abruptly changed to a monotone grey. Coarse grey stones combined with corrugations were camouflaged by the alluvial dirt of the floodplains so the track lived up to its notorious reputation, belying its initial, tamer appearance.

Police Hole Yards provided some welcome shade for a lunch break and was also the end of the more moderate track. For the final 30 kms of the day, we navigated our way along fences and through cattle-yards over the roughest track of the whole journey to date. It was all large, awkward-sized stones, some embedded into the ground, others loose. In the face of adversity, Greg remained in touch with his sense of humour. This time he made jokes about wanting to divert down an even rougher track so that he could boast about visiting Gregory’s Remarkable Pillar – a prominent landmark named after Augustus Gregory, a few kilometres west of Pigeon Hole. We arrived at the homestead just after sundown, later than expected. I felt like a boxer suffering from brain shake. Chaffing was so bad I walked like an apprentice jillaroo after her first day of mustering. Greg was no longer making gags about remarkable pillars!
 

Great Australian Cycle Expedition trailer

Watch this footage from Kate's journey to get a feel for the harsh terrain and conditions she was dealing with while crossing Australia.
 
 
 
Read about Kate's adventures:
 
> Out There and Back. The story of the 25 000-km Great Australian Cycle Expedition. Get your copy as a physical book or digital book, from only $10.
> Njinga. The story of Kate's astonishing 22,000-kilometre trek by bicycle across Africa.  This is more than a story of mental grit and physical endurance – it’s a story of hope. Get your copy of the book.
 
Donate to support Kate's adventures and educational endeavours:
 
 
Follow Kate's adventures on social media:
 
 
Want to win a copy of Out There and Back? We have a couple of copies of Kate's book to give away to 2 lucky members of the Australian Cycle Tours community. Subscribe now (it's free!) and be in it to win it. The prize will be drawn in June 2022. Open to Australian residents only.
 
  
 
Cycle the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail

Cycle the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail

 
At 161km, the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail is Australia's longest rail trail. However, even this isn't enough for travellers who want to continue exploring the delights of country Queensland. This has led to an optional extension to include the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail. The full length of the epic combined Brisbane Valley and Kilkivan Rail Trail Self-Guided Tour is 315km and can be completed in 8 days.
 
Keep reading to find some commonly asked questions about the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail.
 
Linville Hotel on the BVRT |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 

How long is the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail?

The Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail is 90km. 
 

What is the South Burnett Rail Trail?

The South Burnett Rail Trail is a section of the greater Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail. There is a passionate community group called the South Burnett Rail Trail Users Association, which is a not-for-profit group that promotes the use of the rail trail and its future enhancement and expansion.
 

What are the cycling conditions on the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail?

The 90km Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail passes through two councils and each section has a distinct feel. The first half, from Kingaroy to Murgon, is governed by the South Burnett Council. This is also known as the South Burnett Rail Trail. It features easy pedalling along a well-maintained path, which is actually Queensland's longest sealed rail trail at 44km. 
 
The second half, from Murgon to Kilkivan, offers a few more thrills with gravel terrain and small creeks to be crossed (the Gympie Regional Council has promised to build a bridge!).
 
Cycling the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 

What towns does the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail pass?

The starting point is the Kingaroy Railway Station. The trail then goes through Goomeri, Murgon, Wondai, Tingoora, Wooroolin, Memerambi and Crawford, before concluding at Kilkivan Railway Station. On the Brisbane Valley & Kilkivan Rail Trail Self-Guided Cycle tour, the overnight stays are in Nanango (the town before the rail trail), Wondai and Kilkivan.
 

What are the highlights of the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail?

Cycling the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail is a great way to become immersed in the laidback atmosphere of rural Queensland. Besides the heritage-listed pubs and churches, friendly locals, disused railway stations and regional produce, you can also see the following attractions.
 
Kingaroy is famous for its peanut production - it's why it's known as Australia's Peanut Capital. As you cycle into the town, you won't miss the gigantic peanut silos. It's essential to stop by the famous Peanut Van to try some of these local delicacies (their peanut brittle makes for a great cycling snack!).
 
Kilkivan Hotel |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 
There's a nightly show that's free for all in Kingaroy. Due to the limited light pollution, on clear nights the light spectacle in the sky is incredible to witness. For a closer inspection, book a visit to the Kingaroy Observatory.
 
The small town of Goomeri is known for its annual pumpkin festival in May. Outside of this, the quiet country town punches above its size when it comes to gourmet produce and you can taste cheeses, wines, and (of course) pumpkins.
 

Which direction is the best to cycle the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail?

In our opinion, the better direction is to go from Kingaroy to Kilkivan, as this direction has you spending more time cycling downhill. This is the direction our Brisbane Valley & Kilkivan Rail Trail Self-Guided Cycle tour takes.
 
Old Linville Station |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i> Cycling Queensland's rail trails |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i> Sign to Yimbun |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 

How can I cycle the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail?

You can cycle the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail as part of our combined Brisbane Valley & Kilkivan Rail Trail Self-Guided Cycle tour. This is an affordable 8-day trip that takes you through some of the best parts of rural Queensland. 
 
The first half of the itinerary follows the popular Brisbane Valley Rail Trail, from Wulkuraka to Yarraman. Upon reaching the endpoint in Yarraman, you connect the two distinct trails via the aptly named Link Trail, a 56km route that overnights in the country town of Nanango.
 
From Nanango, you'll cycle to the start of the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail at Kingaroy, and then continue on until the final destination at Kilkivan Railway Station. This is an amazing cycle journey of over 300 kilometres.
 

 
> View all rail trail tours
 
Church on the Kilkivan Rail Trail |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i> Yimbun Railway Tunnel |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 

 
Do you want to cycle the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail? Share your thoughts in the comment section below.
 
  
 
Watch: History of the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail Documentary

Watch: History of the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail Documentary

Before you cycle the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail on a self-guided tour, get some background information on the region by watching this well-researched documentary.
 
It's a short 16-minute film that details the early development of the Brisbane Valley railway line to its modern-day transition to a community trail. There are lots of fascinating black and white photos, stories and interviews that make this video a must-see for anyone with an interest in Australian history.
 
 
The Brisbane Valley Rail Trail Documentary is filmed, edited, narrated and directed by Joel Thomas, with funding from the Queensland Government and the South Burnett Regional Council.
 
 
 

 
What did you think of the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail Documentary? Did it make you want to cycle the trail? Let us know in the comment section below.
 
 
How to cycle the Central West Cycle Trail

How to cycle the Central West Cycle Trail

 
The Central West Cycle Trail is quickly becoming a mecca for Australian cyclists. 
 
From the iconic Australiana landscapes filled with eucalyptus and open plains, to the laidback and charming hospitality of the locals along the trail, cycling the Central West Trail is suitable for all kinds of travellers. 
 
There are three ways to explore the Central West Cycle Trail with Australian Cycle Tours. Each trip includes comfortable accommodation, daily luggage transfers, vehicle transfers, navigation app, e-bike hire and local support among other benefits.
 

Central West Cycle Trail Self-Guided Tour

Cyclist on the Central West Cycle route between Mudgee and Gulgong |  <i>Ross Baker</i>
 
The classic route. Over 7 days, you'll experience classic Central West scenery and hospitality. On day 1 you'll be transported from Mudgee to the small hamlet of Goolma, where the Central West Cycle Trail starts. From here you'll discover the country towns of Wellington, Dubbo, Ballimore, Mendooran, Dunedoo and Gulgong, before cycling to Mudgee on the last day. You'll stay in comfortable accommodation in each town and have your luggage transferred daily, allowing you to fully embrace the local atmosphere along the way. 
 
 

Central West Cycle Trail Highlights Self-Guided Tour

Cyclists in Gulgong outside the Ten Dollar Town Motel |  <i>Ross Baker</i>
 
The Central West Cycle Trail Highlights tour offers a similar self-guided experience to the above trip yet cuts down on some stops to shorten the itinerary. The key difference is that on day 2, you'll cycle from Wellington to Baltimore and bypass the 'big city lights' of Dubbo, and the final day of cycling sees you finish in Gulgong before being transferred to Mudgee. This 5 day itinerary will appeal to those who are more limited on time or do not want to include a visit to Dubbo.
 
 

Central West Cycle Trail Supported Tour

Happy cyclists on the Central West Trail |  <i>Shawn Flannery</i>
 
On a supported bike tour of the Central West Cycle Trail you'll be accompanied by an experienced driver who will escort the group. Their role is to provide bicycle assistance, help with any issues that arise, and meet the group at designated breaks for coffee and tea. These tours are more sociable as they attract like-minded travellers to experience the Central West Trail together. Learn more about our supported bike trips.
 
 

 
If you have any further questions on the Central West Cycle Trail please feel free to get in touch over email or calling 13300 114 966. On self-guided trips we are generally able to alter itineraries to accommodate your needs.
 
 

 
Are you planning to cycle the Central West Cycle Trail? Which tour are you interested in doing? Let us know in the comment section below.
 
  
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